Hi. I’m Aidan.

I’m a communication designer specialising in type, publication and brand design. 

Visible

Typography • Ongoing

Type has no gender. Visible is a conceptual typeface that explores the relationship between gender stereotypes in typography and how we use fonts as designers. These stereotypes have been reinforced over many years and can be very unhealthy, such as the long-held notion that decorative typefaces are considered feminine and the assumption that these typefaces are less useful or versatile than ‘masculine’ workhorse typefaces.

By examining a number of these stereotypically masculine or feminine fonts, I discovered which characteristics convey these traits the most, which I then synthesised to create Visible. The typeface consists of three styles: Masc, Femme and Regular (a gender-neutral font on which both gendered variants are based), which each bears the matching gendered characteristics. By creating a typeface that openly defines these stereotypes, my intention is for designers to themselves examine the qualities of masculine and feminine type, and how it affects their choice or use of fonts in their own work.

In addition to creating the three set variants, I also created a variable typeface, which interpolates between these values. In doing so, designers can explore how a typeface’s apparent gender can be explored in vast and nuanced ways that aren’t absolute. It’s also a moment of identification for gender non-conforming people who are bound by society’s binary understanding of gender, in the same way that type is bound by a system of absolute values and parameters.

I'm still in the process of developing Visible into a full-featured typeface, so expect to see some updates in the future.

These examples contain a translated excerpt from XX, XY: Sex, Letters & Stereotypes, by Marie Boulanger.
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Visible (Preview)

Year
Ongoing
Category
Typography
Client
Personal Project

Type has no gender. Visible is a conceptual typeface that explores the relationship between gender stereotypes in typography and how we use fonts as designers. These stereotypes have been reinforced over many years and can be very unhealthy, such as the long-held notion that decorative typefaces are considered feminine and the assumption that these typefaces are less useful or versatile than ‘masculine’ workhorse typefaces.

By examining a number of these stereotypically masculine or feminine fonts, I discovered which characteristics convey these traits the most, which I then synthesised to create Visible. The typeface consists of three styles: Masc, Femme and Regular (a gender-neutral font on which both gendered variants are based), which each bears the matching gendered characteristics. By creating a typeface that openly defines these stereotypes, my intention is for designers to themselves examine the qualities of masculine and feminine type, and how it affects their choice or use of fonts in their own work.

In addition to creating the three set variants, I also created a variable typeface, which interpolates between these values. In doing so, designers can explore how a typeface’s apparent gender can be explored in vast and nuanced ways that aren’t absolute. It’s also a moment of identification for gender non-conforming people who are bound by society’s binary understanding of gender, in the same way that type is bound by a system of absolute values and parameters.

I'm still in the process of developing Visible into a fully-featured typeface, so expect to see some updates in the future.

The words "type has no gender" set in multiple variants of Visible.
A type specimen displaying each variant of the Visible typeface.

In Between

Publication • 2021

A short-form publication on the concept of the non-place: a generic place of mass transit that confers neither a sense of place, nor the existence of personal identities. This project involved the balance use of type for conceptual expression and communication, alongside a critical attention to micro-level details.

A bare, rational structure with text set in Neue Haas Grotesk leaves the publication without personality and identity. Additional elements such as barcodes and detail text set in bitmap fonts complement this feeling, inspired by the digital systems and processes that regulate the non-place.

Spliced text, warp scans and photographic elements gently counter the uniformity of the publication, adding visual interest without tearing apart the standardised neutral aesthetic. The result is a 40-page paperback publication that effectively ties together the themes of the text through a balanced combination of industrial and hand-adjusted type and imagery.

All text sourced from ‘Baring Life & Lifestyle in the Non-Place’, Sarah Sharma (2008).
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In Between

Year
2021
Category
Publication
Client
Uni Project

A short-form publication on the concept of the non-place: a generic place of mass transit that confers neither a sense of place, nor the existence of personal identities. This project involved the balance use of type for conceptual expression and communication, alongside a critical attention to micro-level details.

A bare, rational structure with text set in Neue Haas Grotesk leaves the publication without personality and identity. Additional elements such as barcodes and detail text set in bitmap fonts complement this feeling, inspired by the digital systems and processes that regulate the non-place.

Spliced text, warp scans and photographic elements gently counter the uniformity of the publication, adding visual interest without tearing apart the standardised neutral aesthetic. The result is a 40-page paperback publication that effectively ties together the themes of the text through a balanced combination of industrial and hand-adjusted type and imagery.

Text sourced from 'Baring Life & Lifestyle in the Non-Place', Sarah Sharma (2008).

A magazine spread held open by the reader's hands.Multiple photographs of a magazine including a chapter title, contents, cover and inside cover spread.A magazine spread with a page of text and a full-page image.Experimental distorted text.

Hello

Brand & Identity • 2021

Branding for a global consumer tech company, with a focus on core brand values of simplicity, accessibility and openness. The brand identity was designed to be applied across a wide variety of contexts, from digital advertising to packaging to campus wayfinding. 

The brandmark is a keen example of the most simple solutions often being the best ones. The “bubble” - a square with three fully rounded corners - is a universal symbol of conversation that aptly encompasses the brand values. The simple gradient applied to the bubble organically blends the four vibrant brand colours, evoking the gradient-led design language for modern tech branding. When paired with playful yet professional display and body type, the brand’s personality comes to life: simple, reliable, personal and not at risk of taking itself too seriously.

The process was effectively an exercise in visual brevity, a challenge to communicate the brand in its most distilled form, without the unnecessary ornamentation or overly complex visual language. This project also greatly utilised skills across many disciplines: from branding to 3D modelling, to publication and packaging design, each skill was employed extensively to create a well-realised brand identity.

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Hello

Year
2021
Category
Branding
Client
Uni Project

Branding for a global consumer tech company, with a focus on core brand values of simplicity, accessibility and openness. The brand identity was designed to be applied across a wide variety of contexts, from digital advertising to packaging to campus wayfinding. 

The brandmark is a keen example of the most simple solutions often being the best ones. The “bubble” - a square with three fully rounded corners - is a universal symbol of conversation that aptly encompasses the brand values. The simple gradient applied to the bubble organically blends the four vibrant brand colours, evoking the gradient-led design language for modern tech branding. When paired with playful yet professional display and body type, the brand’s personality comes to life: simple, reliable, personal and not at risk of taking itself too seriously.

The process was effectively an exercise in visual brevity, a challenge to communicate the brand in its most distilled form, without the unnecessary ornamentation or overly complex visual language. This project also greatly utilised skills across many disciplines: from branding to 3D modelling, to publication and packaging design, each skill was employed extensively to create a well-realised brand identity.

Brand elements, including a brandmark, font examples, blue, purple, yellow and orange colour scheme, and secondary brandmark.The words for "hello" in multiple languages, arranged in a vertical list.A digital advertisement in an Instagram feed displaying a smartphone and words "say hello to the future".Multiple views of brand applications, including business cards, letterhead, envelope and smartphone.A digital advertisement featuring a smartphone and the words "say hello to the future", displayed on a subway advertising display.A white branded tote-bag against an orange backdrop, held in a person's hand.

The Melbourne Theatre Guide

Publication & Digital • 2021

Tasked with creating a publication for both print and digital media, I created The Melbourne Theatre Guide, a monthly publication about theatre and performing arts in Melbourne. This project required careful consideration and planning when designing elements initially, as each element produced for print needed to be later translated for screen. I worked across multiple disciplines for this project, utilising skills across typesetting, photography, copywriting and user experience design.

The overall design approach is heavily inspired by public way-finding and transit maps, in particular Massimo Vignelli’s New York subway maps, which is reflected through the choice of colour, type and layout. The simple geometric illustrations for each theatre are based on exteriors of the theatres and their iconic characteristics, which I studied carefully by visiting and photographing each location.

When translating the print designs to screen, I didn’t need to make too many changes thanks to the strict grid-based approach I used from the start. I did however take the opportunity to breathe more life into the design through animating the illustrations and focusing on the interactive experience. I also created versions of the illustrations as icons that I could use on the map page to mark the location of each theatre.

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The Melbourne Theatre Guide

Year
2021
Category
Publication & Digital
Client
Uni Project

Tasked with creating a publication for both print and digital media, I created The Melbourne Theatre Guide, a monthly publication about theatre and performing arts in Melbourne. This project required careful consideration and planning when designing elements initially, as each element produced for print needed to be later translated for screen. I worked across multiple disciplines for this project, utilising skills across typesetting, photography, copywriting and user experience design.

The overall design approach is heavily inspired by public way-finding and transit maps, in particular Massimo Vignelli’s New York subway maps, which is reflected through the choice of colour, type and layout. The simple geometric illustrations for each theatre are based on exteriors of the theatres and their iconic characteristics, which I studied carefully by visiting and photographing each location.

When translating the print designs to screen, I didn’t need to make too many changes thanks to the strict grid-based approach I used from the start. I did however take the opportunity to breathe more life into the design through animating the illustrations and focusing on the interactive experience. I also created versions of the illustrations as icons that I could use on the map page to mark the location of each theatre.

Multiple webpages displayed on an array of iPhone displays.A magazine page with a red geometric illustration, body of text and photo with the title "regent theatre".The cover of a magazine with the title "the melbourne theatre guide" and an illustration resembling a map.Multiple webpages displayed on an array of iPad displays.A magazine spread with a contents page, a body of text and a heading that reads "welcome home".

Royal Botanic Gardens: Annual Report

Publication • 2021

An exercise in functional typesetting, this unofficial annual report for Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria utilises a strict grid system for a well-structured layout. Its aesthetics - from type to layout - are influenced heavily by the international typographic style as a tribute to the works of Keller, Müller-Brockmann and their contemporaries.

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Royal Botanic Gardens: Annual Report

Year
2021
Category
Publication
Client
Uni Project

An exercise in functional typesetting, this unofficial annual report for Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria utilises a strict grid system for a well-structured layout. Its aesthetics - from type to layout - are influenced heavily by the international typographic style as a tribute to the works of Keller, Müller-Brockmann and their contemporaries.

Strict adherence to the grid layout and typographic hierarchy did complicate the layout and arrangement of content initially, but through careful planning was resolved to form a rationalised and systematic layout. Additional clarity is provided by the restrained use of colour, which helps to highlight important details with great effectiveness, as well as pairing with black and white photographs to reintroduce organic shapes into an otherwise industrial layout.

This conflict between rationalised and organic elements and the contrast between coloured accents and black and white imagery gives the piece life and helps to hold the reader’s interest where it could easily be lost in the somewhat uninspiring environment of facts, numbers and statistics.

All text sourced from Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria Annual Report 2017-18.

A booklet chapter title spread with full page black and white imagery of trees on the left and a title on the right that reads "4, towards a sustainable future", with green marker scribbles across the spread.The cover of a booklet with the title "royal botanic gardens annual report 2020-21" and green marker scribbles over a black and white photograph of leaves.A booklet page with financial figures and a heading that reads "comprehensive operating statement".A booklet spread with two full pages of body text, and headings that read "impact snapshot" and "sustainable resource management".